Gratuitous Sopranos thread

Rebecca Traister [profiled here] is my favourite writer on tv. How spot on is this?

I have never understood people who yammer on about wanting “closure”; they can’t wait to have the mysteries of their relationships explained, their strings tied neatly into bows. To me, not knowing is the pulp of life — the thing that keeps us getting out of bed, keeps us moving forward toward the conclusion. Getting there — reaching the end, finis, kaput — in life or in fantasy: to me, that is the deepest affront; it is an end to imagination, a limit on possibility; it is final. It is death.

<img src="http://larvatusprodeo.net/wp-content/uploads/2007/04/sopranos1.jpg&quot;

I know exactly how she feels:

Last Sunday night HBO aired the first of the nine episodes that will finish off “The Sopranos,” a show that has beguiled and terrified us with its violence, passion and unnervingly good humor for eight years. The final installment is scheduled to air on June 10. Six weeks later, J.K. Rowling will publish “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows,” the seventh and final book in her gripping bildungsroman saga about growing up Gryffindor.

It would be disingenuous to suggest that I am anything other than achingly, pantingly, pathetically anxious for these next and final chapters. Sunday was a holiday for me, and not because of the risen Christ; by the time the synth drum started beating over Tony’s ninth-to-final ride away from Manhattan I was, quite literally, wiggling with pleasure. But 52 minutes later it was over, one hour of my final nine spent, the lonely chill of impending finality taking hold.

A shadow hung over the show from the opening scene, in which menacing knocking drives Tony and Carmela from bed, and Carm expresses her first half-conscious thought: “Is this it?” I’m sorry to say that it is. And knowing that this is it, it was hard not to read the tea leaves: Tony’s Fredo-rific rowboat talks with Bobby, that creepy story about a kid drowning in a swimming pool, so like the swimming pool from which the Soprano family saga first took flight.

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10 comments on “Gratuitous Sopranos thread
  1. Christine Keeler says:

    …and if Channel nine stop fucking round with scheduling, don’t stop series midway through, and treated their audience with a modicum of respect we might get to see it too.

    Memo to Nine marketing department: Just call it ‘Sopranos CSI’. You’ll be happy and we’ll stop getting dicked around.

  2. Kim says:

    To be fair to the schedulers, Christine, there are actually kinda two bits to the last series. More than the standard 13 eps have been made, and there was a lag between the first six (now out on dvd here I think) and the new ones coming up in the States too.

  3. Christine Keeler says:

    Venting.

  4. Kim says:

    It’s not often that you have to be fair to the schedulers.

  5. j_p_z says:

    “that creepy story about a kid drowning in a swimming pool, so like the swimming pool from which the Soprano family saga first took flight.”

    They just found your father
    Floating in the swimming pool.
    And you guess you won’t be going
    Back to school
    Anymore…

  6. Adam Gall says:

    “Getting there — reaching the end, finis, kaput — in life or in fantasy: to me, that is the deepest affront; it is an end to imagination, a limit on possibility; it is final. It is death.”

    I understand the sentiment, but sometimes fantastic things must die before they descend into living irrelevance. I’ve been looking forward to the end of the Sopranos for a couple of seasons now, and not because I don’t like the show.

  7. el says:

    As someone who’s still in the second series of the Sopranos, I don’t want there to be an end. I want it to go on forever. At least I’ve got seven-and-a-half series to go.

  8. Ron says:

    “At least I’ve got seven-and-a-half series to go.”

    You don’t have broadband?

  9. Ron says:

    “…and if Channel nine stop fucking round with scheduling, …”

    They all do it. I hate the way Ch10 drops repeats into the middle of current series – really screws up continuity.

  10. Christine Keeler says:

    We can write off Ten for anything useful for the next few months. It’ll be wall-to-wall Big Bother

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