Liberal keen to see economy destroyed

As a vigorous debate rages within the remnants of the Liberal party as to whether they should allow Labor’s windback of WorkChoices to pass in the Senate, one Liberal backbencher has voiced support, because he’d like to see the economy ruined:

for my part I wouldn’t be too unhappy if they went through because my view is they’ll only damage the economy and cause unemployment figures to worsen.

Anyone from Ryan? How did this lunatic hold his seat?

Maybe the Libs don’t read the Fin Review. They might have noticed that most of the big biz groups have now jumped on the “trash WorkChoices” bandwagon and are admitting that a little bit of balance and fairness won’t send the country broke. The Libs would be very dumb indeed to allow Rudd to paint them as the party of unfairness at work, now, and forever. But they’d also be well advised to stick to the mandate theory, or recognise that the electorate thought WorkChoices stank, rather than indulge in the sort of stupid partisanship Michael Johnson has on display.

Elsewhere: More from Sam at Public Polity.

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Posted in federal election '07, politics
46 comments on “Liberal keen to see economy destroyed
  1. Kezza says:

    I heard this on the news when I woke up this morning and thought it was hilarious. I live in Ryan and helped out the Labor Ross Daniels campaign. It’s a leafy green wealthy seat full of people who would still vote Liberal if the government was totally on the nose and you ran your favourite potted geranium as their candidate (I guess at least the geranium might be able to keep its mouth shut). I heard we ended up with the best result for Labor in a Federal Election since 1949, which still wasn’t enough to unseat Johnson, but says a lot about how people feel about him and the outgoing Libs.

    I hope Johnson keeps talking, he had a margin of around 10% which is now between 3-4%, if he keeps up the idiocy he may be in trouble next time around.

  2. Sam Clifford says:

    Kim, the fact that business groups feel free to say that WorkChoices goes too far really shows what an ideologically charged piece of legislation it was. Howard was fighting the unions of days long gone, Keating’s accord with the unions provided the starting point for Australia’s economic growth and as such we were able to take advantage of the mining boom.

    With Howard gone and many of the old battle axes such as Ruddock retiring, the Liberals can dump this pre-accord view of the role of unions in Australia and start coming up with policies rooted in the 21st century rather than in the 19th.

  3. Katz says:

    In the 1950s the Communist Party of Australia often argued that a return of the Coalition to government was a good thing because reactionaries would hasten the coming of the Proletarian Revolution.

    Sounds like this clown has adapted his strategy ay from the Commo playbook.

  4. murph the surf says:

    Well 60 years later they look to have bene vindicated , don’t you think Katz?
    Long march and all that other stuff.

  5. Austin says:

    Ryan is an interesting demographic, but can be summarised quite simply as “liberal rust”. Johnson is a good party trumpet, but has problems with independent thinking. This is clearly one of those occasions.

  6. Ambigulous says:

    Katz

    So in the 1950’s Australia kept electing Liberal Govts, and the Proletarian Revolution didn’t arrive… so where was the flaw in the Communists’ political reasoning?

    I can see the moral flaw: they were wishing misery on the poor and lower paid, in the hope of a revolt. Callous, cold, cruel.

    cheerio

  7. Enemy Combatant says:

    From Classic Moments in Conservative Fiscal Rectitude:

    “In order to save The Economy, it is first necessary to destoy it”.

    Michael “Hoonster” Johnson,
    MHR Ryan, Queensland,
    Wednesday, November 28, 2007.

  8. Ambigulous says:

    May we take a reading of his Rectitude using a Rectal Fiscalometer? 😉

  9. Helen says:

    Not unless you want to cause a fiscula. And NO fisking jokes, please.

  10. Bingo Bango Boingo says:

    Shocking stuff, agreed, but he didn’t say he wanted to see the economy destroyed. Let’s not mispresent the man. Is this the kind of Tim Blair-esque titling we should come to expect on LP?

    BBB

  11. nasking says:

    “because he’d like to see the economy ruined”

    I assumed that was the plan from the moment the Libs knew there was a chance that Labor would win…starting in 2004..:)

  12. Chris says:

    Heh, reminds me of the Labor and Green supporters I know who were celebrating every time interest rates went up since the 2004 election 🙂

  13. Enemy Combatant says:

    Bingo, what a shame it is that satire is wasted on the irredeemably doctrinaire.

  14. murph the surf says:

    I’d call bullshit on this thread’s lead off being satire .
    It’s not reflecting the reported comments accurately , not even trying to be funny.
    Kimberella keeps up this standard of work and we should start calling her Miranderella or maybe Kiberechtson ?

  15. Bingo Bango Boingo says:

    EC, my remarks were directed at kimberella and the original post, not your comment. But anyway you’re right. It is indeed a shame when satire is wasted. Of course, the greater shame is that which must befall the author of satire that is simply bad. Surely we agree on that?

    BBB

  16. John Ryan says:

    I assume you have missed the contribution from the collective genius of the WA Libs, led by Tuckey,i mean how dumb are these people,a better question might be why people keep electing Tuckey.
    But then WA is 10 yrs behind in most things,according to the WA Libs they should not change anything, I think they think its all a dreadful mistake and they will wake up soon

  17. murph the surf says:

    Re WA – “I think they think its all a dreadful mistake and they will wake up soon…”
    More calls for succession to come no doubt!

  18. Luke says:

    I think the entire Liberal Party is in for a bit of Rectal Fistitude.

  19. Andrew E says:

    most of the big biz groups have now jumped on the “trash WorkChoices” bandwagon

    I was in the Liberal Party when the ideas that subsequently became WorkChoices were forming. When the legislation was rolled out there was a deafening silence from business groups. I now realise that this silence was ominous, the dog that did not bark.

    Business groups did not want WorkChoices, and the small numbers who did can be classified into two groups: those employers who tend naturally to exploitation, or those employers who gave up the fight for both an adequate workforce on low wages, and when forced to choose plumped for the former. This is why all that shrieking about “Howard and his big business mates” forcing everyone onto AWAs was such bullshit.

    Howard gave the business community WorkChoices in the same way that your pet cat might deposit a dead sugar-glider on your pillow: however well-intentioned, the reality was repellent.

    As to Johnson, people say all sorts of mad things in grief. If I were on radio now, I’d cut to this song.

  20. Gaz says:

    “Business groups did not want WorkChoices, and the small numbers who did can be classified into two groups: those employers who tend naturally to exploitation, or those employers who gave up the fight for both an adequate workforce on low wages, and when forced to choose plumped for the former. This is why all that shrieking about “Howard and his big business mates” forcing everyone onto AWAs was such bullshit.”

    And who said there was no room for satire on L.P.

  21. Gaz says:

    “I was in the Liberal Party ”

    Jesus who would admit to that on L.P.? shit more satire.!

  22. FDB says:

    “Howard gave the business community WorkChoices in the same way that your pet cat might deposit a dead sugar-glider on your pillow: however well-intentioned, the reality was repellent.”

    As slippery a bugger as you can be Andrew, I must give credit for this excellent analogy.

  23. Enemy Combatant says:

    Bingo, thought kimberella’s post was funny enough to warrant a response.
    Better than a burnt stick in the eye of the beholder, I guess.

  24. Paul Burns says:

    More of Liberal determinsation to stuff things up for Labor. (Read that satirically).
    At a Last Supper at the Lodge JWH appealed emotionally to his former Liberal colleagues not to trash his lagacay. “His was nment.” Peter Costello did not attend. All Liberal leadership contenders did attend, shoring up their numbers.
    I am unhappy that this Last Supper took place at the Lodge, a) bewcause I was denied the opportunity of seeing JWH either in tears or really really having a temper tantrum
    b) because it may have been held with taxpayer funds. As a fiscal conservative how can Ruddbot allow this kind of thing.

  25. Wilson Tuckey. Publican. (Noble vocation) And just WHAT is wrong with him? Has this site been taken over by teetotallers or something?

  26. David Rubie says:

    C’mon Paul, you can’t have a last supper without Judas, it just doesn’t work.
    I don’t care where Costello was (still sulking somewhere) but it’s Downer’s whereabouts I worry about.

  27. zebbidies spring says:

    Seems the Commonwealth Bank didn’t mind trying for a bit of that dead sugar-glider action.

    The idea that corporations with their “harder-nosed than thou” HR managers would pass up the opportunity to reduce their costs as soon as they could is, shall we say, charmingly naive. The only reason it hasn’t been happening much is because of the extremely tight labour market. When that peaked (as it must have eventually), then we would have seen Big Business make full, ingenious and rapid use of that tool.

  28. FDB says:

    Oh come now David.

    Surely after so long as Foreign Minister, the world’s brimming with lucrative offers from folks who’ve endured enjoyed his company.

  29. David Rubie says:

    I’d like to extend an offer to kick Downer repeatedly in the plums until my leg gets tired FDB. After that, he can do what he likes 🙂

  30. Paul Burns says:

    Tony Abbott on Lateline tonight revealed that Howard and the Liberals are still like the Bourbons. ‘They have learnt nothing and forgotten nothing.” [cf. Gough Whitlam, circa 1972]Howard still thinks they didn’t lose Government because of him. Peter Coleman that Liberal patriarch of yore, however, believes the loss was entirely due to Howard’s egomania. (or so I gather). Abbott does not agree with Coleman’s family sympathies and believes Costello is partly to blame. (or entirely to blame. Just like Howard, whom he no doubt got this from.
    Meanmwhile, behind the scenes, Turnbull tries to turn the Liberal Party into the ALP.
    And I thought the Bold and the Beautiful was relentlessly fascinating. It hasn’t a patch on the Liberals in defeat.

  31. Evan says:

    The Libs are curently undertaking The Search For Those Responsible. According to the Standard Stalinist Purge Handbook, the next stage is invariably The Punishment of The Innocent.

    For the good of the Party, the Great Leader’s reputation must not be tarnished in any way.

  32. David Rubie says:

    Damn – I missed the Mad Monk on Lateline. I wonder if we’ll see a perfect re-enactment of the 1980’s with Abbott playing Howard and Turnbull playing Peacock. How, I wonder, would Howard justify blaming Costello for the defeat? What was Abbott’s justification for that?

  33. Gaz says:

    “Howard still thinks they didn’t lose Government because of him.”

    And by God why would he?The man is a paragon of virtue,a giant among men, he saved us from the Asiatic hordes who would descend down on us and take over our Latte Strips and turn them into little China towns, and ruin our culture.The man was a raconteur,not easily understood by the chattering classes,a man ahead of his time.

    Hang on a mo,my wifes calling me,time for my medicine.tudaloo.

  34. Paul Burns says:

    David,
    Abbott didn’t actually give a justification for blaming Costello. I gather it goes along the lines of he was there and we didn’t want him to succeed Howard so the Libs lost, but that was all inferred. Also,
    Abbott was apparently up to his neck in the Islamophobic Lindsay pamphlet. Tony Jones was questioning him relentlessly about it.
    From what he said its unclear if Turnbull has the numbers for tomorrow, but I rather think he has. And Tony will be watching to ensure Malcolm (or Nelson) keeps to the Howardista line or a challenge will be in the offing. I think that was the subtext.

  35. wbb says:

    Yes, David Rubie, Abbott is awaiting for a time when he can lop Turnbull’s fat head from his shoulders. It’ll happen too.

  36. David Rubie says:

    Paul Burns wrote:

    Also,
    Abbott was apparently up to his neck in the Islamophobic Lindsay pamphlet.

    Unsurprising. It will be interesting to see if they can successfully hang the whole thing on Costello, since he appears to have sooked off into the distance and is unable or unwilling to defend himself (also unsurprising). Where is Downer? Anyone? Has he been secreted out of the country or something?

  37. Paul Burns says:

    David,
    I think Downer at was some prior arranged innocent social event or something.He looked like he was in an underground hotel car park.
    My theory is he is keeping his hands “clean” so he can follow Malcolm with a “clear” conscience when Malcolm moves the Libs to the left of the ALP.

  38. anthony says:

    When did Murph and B3 become the satire police?

    Mr Liberal Backbencher has assumed the position of wishing harm to the economy so he can say I told you so. As such, he’s a tool, as such he’s not worth my quibble. Personally I’d go for straight mockery but Kim’s always had more class than myself.

    Wilson Tuckey? Not even the people who vote for Wilson Tuckey, bless ’em, like Wilson Tuckey.

  39. FDB says:

    Anthony – I used to work at the races on the PA when he was President of the WA Turf Club.

    That’s right, I have taken money in exchange for MAKING WILSON TUCKEY’S VOICE MORE EASILY AUDIBLE.

  40. Katz says:

    Katz

    So in the 1950’s Australia kept electing Liberal Govts, and the Proletarian Revolution didn’t arrive… so where was the flaw in the Communists’ political reasoning?

    Could it be that the Liberals were too lazy to be evil?

  41. Anyone from Ryan? How did this lunatic hold his seat?

    Blame the electors of Moggill (Bruce Flegg territory). It was the same yokels that got Michael Johnson up. A check of the polling booths has the ALP in front in places like Toowong, Indooroopilly and The Gap.

  42. Jane says:

    Steve at the Pub, don’t forget there’s good publicans and then there’s Iron Bar.
    Don’t worry, David Rubie, Queen Alex was probably down the shops buying a fresh pair of fishnets and some lippie.
    And don’t you love the implication of the “Last Supper”? We can only hope they were doing the final measurements for his gallows.

  43. Pollytickedofff says:

    Isn’t it telling though that at the Last Supper the unelected joint Leader of the Opposition had to have HER say as well?

  44. Careless metaphor choice alert!

    The “Last Supper” was attended by our saviours.

  45. #42 Jane, The pub trade has more than it’s fair share of urgers, though most laymen do not get to see this.

    Wilson Tuckey is a bad publican, how?

  46. anthony says:

    FDB! Tuckey’s Willing Elocutioner?

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