Cabinet announced, Nelson to lead Liberals

OK, just quickly, here is Rudd’s new Cabinet. Noteworthy:

  • Julia Gillard gets IR and education.
  • Peter Garrett gets environment, heritage and the arts, but water and climate change have been hived off into a new portfolio for Penny Wong.
  • Bob McMullan is not in the Cabinet, he’s been given a Parliamentary Secretary position on international aid.
  • Mar’n Ferguson gets resources, energy, and tourism. That may lead to some interesting cabinet bunfights, given Ferguson’s public association with climate change skepticism.
  • As well as Joel Fitzgibbon as Defence Minister, the ABC has both Greg Combet and Mike Kelly as Parliamentary Secretaries in the area, with Greg Combet given responsibilities in the area of defence procurement.

Meanwhile, it’s Nelson leading the Opposition, with Bishop deputy. If I were Rudd, I’d be putting my two Parliamentary Secretaries for Defence to work reviewing Nelson’s record in defence procurement…

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Posted in politics
87 comments on “Cabinet announced, Nelson to lead Liberals
  1. Tony Healy says:

    Also worth noting the signs of fresh thinking in the assigning and describing of some of the innovation-related portfolios.

    For example, Helen Coonan’s brown cardigan “Communications and ICT” has become Conroy’s Broadband Economy and Digital Economy, which is much sharper.

    Craig Emerson’s responsibilities explicitly identify the role of contracting and the so-called service economy. This is a smart move. Similarly, Kim Carr’s portfolio includes the label Innovation, which is a good book-keeping move. Innovation is a term thrown around so loosely that there’s not much to say, but it is good to see Labor policy elevating its role.

  2. Tony Healy says:

    And Penny Wong with Climate Change and Water. Brilliant.

  3. Compared to Nelson, Simon Crean is going to seem a strong opposition leader.

    Garrett has effectively been given a “window seat”.

    Some excellent opportunities in that cabinet for some “very robust” discussions in cabinet!

  4. Beppie says:

    Is there a minister for Multicultural Affairs? I haven’t heard that mentioned anywhere yet…

  5. Sam Clifford says:

    Nelson’s dealings in the JSF and Superhornet need to be scrutinised straight away. Going against the recommendations of the report is just not on for a government minister and someone the Libs are touting as an alternative PM. Rudd could sink the Liberals from the get-go with a well researched report.

  6. tigtog says:

    Given that the repeal of Workchoices has probably already been largely worked out, and a potentially deadlocked Senate won’t let much else through in Industrial Relations reform, giving Gillard Education as well seems a good move. There’s a lot to do there with purely ministerial rather than legislative powers.

  7. Beppie: Laurie Ferguson is Parl Sec for Multicultural Affairs and Settlement Programs (whatever that means).

  8. Bingo Bango Boingo says:

    Don’t forget Minister for Social Inclusion too. Gillard will have her hands full.

    BBB

  9. Shaun says:

    News decides that the length of Rudd’s speech is the pressing issue of the day.

  10. Sam Clifford says:

    Speaking of length, I’m looking forward to the referendum on fixed terms. Rudd may yet buy himself an extra year in government if the Libs can regroup.

  11. “Given that the repeal of Workchoices has probably already been largely worked out, and a potentially deadlocked Senate won’t let much else through in Industrial Relations reform, giving Gillard Education as well seems a good move. There’s a lot to do there with purely ministerial rather than legislative powers.”

    Don’t worry too much Tigtog, July will arrive before we know it.

    and I may be banging on the same drum for months, but don’t be so sure that Workchoices will be repealed. A name change, and a complete change of the contents perhaps, but power returned to the states by the feds? Let’s wait & see…..

    (A new head & a new handle on the Workchoices axe for sure, but returning it to the previous owner’s toolbox and giving up the power to wield that axe?…..^^ )

  12. Guise says:

    So Peter gets to look after the dry bits of Australia, and Penny gets the wet bits. Hmm.

    Disappointing, really. For weeks I’ve been hoping Senator Wong would get Education. The mental picture of Christian schools begging for money from an Asian lesbian has been most entertaining.

  13. Tim Hollo says:

    Celebrating Wong in Climate! A strong Minister, and bringing it back to the Senate for solid debate – Wong vs Milne. That’s the end of the enormous frustration of having to deal with Minchin and Abetz for so long…

  14. jethro says:

    I would have preferred John Faulkner in Defense to Joel Fitzgibbon.

  15. Roger Jones says:

    Hmmm. Horatio Nelson stands on the burning deck, pretending that the party dinghy is the fleet flagship. Disguising himself as the enemy, in the guise of secret agent Kyoto and ex-union leader (AMA), he will stalk them and overpower them with his mighty hair.

    Soon it will come out that the navy has ordered new submarines with flyscreen doors, especially for Australian conditions. Then where will Horatio be?

    Kismet

  16. j_p_z says:

    “The mental picture of Christian schools begging for money from an Asian lesbian has been most entertaining.”

    Well, that certainly didn’t take long at all.

    (btw, she must be one fabulously wealthy Asian lesbian. Or would it be the public’s money you had in mind?)

  17. Anthony says:

    “Don’t forget Minister for Social Inclusion too. Gillard will have her hands full.”

    Social inclusion to most governments just means getting people into work or education (whether they want to or not) so it seems an appropriate add-on to her other portfolios.

    As for Nelson, as I said across at Blogocracy, who’d have thought they’d elect a former union boss as their leader?

  18. Bingo Bango Boingo says:

    Anthony, professional cartels like the AMA are hardly trade unions.

    BBB

  19. Chris says:

    “Don’t forget Minister for Social Inclusion too. Gillard will have her hands full.”

    What no Minister for Peace and Happiness? Isn’t that considered important to the new government?

    Sam – totally agree on fixed terms, would even prefer 5 year fixed terms rather than 4 so we get less of the election year bribes and more time to for governments to see their changes actually take effect. More likely that governments will take on controversial long term planning if they know people will see some results before the next election.

  20. Tony D says:

    “Nelson to lead the Liberals”

    BAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!

    Damn, I was right all along!

  21. David Rubie says:

    In the portfolio that my job will be most affected by (primary industry), he’s given the nod to Tony Burke. I suppose compared to the long collection of bumpkins in the job he might be a breath of fresh air, but there is a serious amount of head-scratching going on right now in the peak rural councils. They used to know where they stood with National MP’s and senators (i.e. give us the cash!), be interesting to see what happens to all the research CRC’s and the rest of the wobbly tower of rural funding if Tony wields a meat-axe instead 🙂

    Oh wait, that’ll mean I’ll be out of a job. Please don’t take my 50% fed. govt. teat Mr Burke, I’ve got kids to feed!

  22. David Rubie says:

    One other thing: Why wasn’t Jenny Macklin dropped and what the hell is she doing in Indigenous Affairs and community housing? Grumble, grumble.

  23. Sam Clifford says:

    Chris, a five year House of Reps term would put the Senate term at 10 years. No thank you! GVTs end up electing people unintentionally like Steven Fielding and I don’t think we’d enjoy Len Harris or anyone else from a party like ONP being elected in a brief flurry of excitement only to have them sit in the Senate for ten years. You may not be able to take the government back on Boxing Day but a ten year Senate term is essentially a “No Returns” policy.

  24. Chris says:

    Sam, well most of the abberations in the senate could be removed by having above the line preferential voting. And if the senate is really that bad, then the government does have the option of a double dissolution.

    I just think we’ll be stuck with with short term planning (especially if there is a short term downside to achieve a long term benefit) whilst we have 3 year terms.

  25. The Rockstar Philosopher says:

    Five years worries me a bit. If a party gets senate and reps, then there’s a long time before you can stop them. Imagine what the Libs could have done with two more years. I think it would leave the political system a little inflexible and unable to adapt to a changing world. It’s clear how easy it is to steal an election with good spin in the course of a campaign (the campaigns would be all year long affairs like this one was too), and many people would vote after being lied to, and then have no recourse for five years.

    I think four years is an appropriate time, and I think we should have single senate terms. What’s the rationale behind splitting them (I’m sure there’s good reason, I just don’t know it to evaluate whether 8 year terms would be too much).

  26. C K says:

    God, this is going to be fun.

    WATCH! the fur fly as the Leader of HM Loyal Opposition gets royally gored for pissing $6 billion against the wall purchasing a squadron of flying elephants!

    MARVEL! at the words of Jokin’ Joe being flung in their faces as they lamely defend the final smoking ruins of the WorkChoices Alpenfestung!

    GAPE! in awe as Grand Mal and People Skills continually protest their loyalty!

    QUAKE! in fright at the kidnapping of Dennis Shannahan, loyal PM arse-kisser, and his replacement with the other Dennis Shannahan, loyal PM arse-kisser.

  27. GregM says:

    “GAPE! in awe as Grand Mal”

    This with “Petit Mal” from Enemy Combatant?

    Is it open season on people with disabilities at LP now?

    It seems to me that John Howard has won his war on political correctness.

  28. Mug Punter says:

    Changed my mind [Listened to Nelson and Bishop after their election today]: Fair trials for the guilty, then the executions.

  29. Sam Clifford says:

    Rockstar, I think it’s to ensure that the Senate isn’t subject to the same sort of politicking as the House of Representatives. A longer wait until re-election means they can take the principled stand without fear of electoral backlash. Of course, it just means dead-head party hacks are put to obey the party line for a longer time.

    3 year terms for both houses would be interesting. It would cut the quota to 7.7% and you’d be almost guaranteed the minor parties would hold the balance of power. The Greens would get elected on primaries, Hanson’s mob would get a seat in a state or two, popular independents could be elected far more easily, etc. It’d also be a step towards the Additional Member System as the Senate seats could easily be re-allocated to restore proportionality overall rather than being based on a completely different set of numbers.

  30. mbahnisch says:

    Nelson’s interview on the 7 30 Report made it very clear that he won by promising WA Liberals not just support for Bishop but also a hard line on WorkChoices and the Stolen Generations Apology. So much for “progressive” Liberalism. They’d be mad to defend WorkChoices now – not just because it was the major factor behind their defeat but also as CK says, because so many of them have gone on the record admitting that. Meanwhile most of big biz have also moved on from it. Nelson may be dooming himself to irrelevance.

  31. C K says:

    “Is it open season on people with disabilities at LP now?”

    Well I don’t know about EC’s contribution GregM. But he’s Malcolm Turnbull and he’s fantastic!

    He’ll tell you himself.

  32. Doug says:

    The really interesting appointment is that of John Faulkner – Cabinet Secretary with responsibility for monitoring the quality of Cabinet submissions, management of the Cabinet Implementation Unit to keep an eye on public service delivery and responsibility for the integrity in government agenda.

    Some real hope that we get some substantial outcomes on FOI – interesting times for the senior SES – Faulkner has a good idea where many of the skeletons are located and should not be easily snowed

  33. GregM says:

    C K, If you don’t like Turnbull call him “shithead” or something like that.

    But the Grand/Petit Mal thing is ultimately using a stereotype of people with a disability to make a cheap political point. Epilepsy is a cruel condition to have and epileptics have faced cruel prejudice. Your comment has mocked it.

    I had thought that this site was more grown-up than that.

  34. wasjotoo says:

    A pretty ordinary performance from an ex-union AMA heavy, ex-labor, thug, for sure, Mark.

  35. wasjotoo says:

    Further, for clarity, why would they go for an ex-union official in Nelson ?

  36. kimberella says:

    Fair call, GregM, so I’ve removed the word “Petit” from the title of my earlier post and apologise for any offence.

    Great to see Penny Wong take a prominent position in the Labor ministry, and Doug is spot on re – Faulkner. I suspect he’ll also be something of an enforcer of discipline for Rudd.

    Anyone else notice how Nelson rambled and wouldn’t shut up tonight? I don’t think with him and Bishop the Libs have done themselves any presentational favours.

  37. pablo says:

    I was surprised by Nelson’s win as it seemed to be a foregone (MSM?) conclusion that Malcolm would get up. Be interesting to see if any pundit was backing the ex-unionist and the winning margin of three is hardly a confidence booster.

  38. bjohns says:

    Would I be giving the Libs too much credit when saying that they’re saving Malcolm for the next term? Nelson will serve the roll as professional shit stirrer for now and when the serious business begins Malcolm will smell of roses by comparison, in Liberal circles anyway.

  39. mbahnisch says:

    That kinda assumes that Nelson doesn’t take them backwards, which is a distinct possibility. Though Malcolm Mackerras correctly pointed out that the Labor win isn’t quite as big as it appeared on election night, a useless opposition leader could lead to the sort of scenario we’ve seen in Qld, NSW and Victoria – though a bit moderated at both polls – ie comfortable win for the first term, picking up seats for the second term. If Labor can get itself into a position where it’s looking at three terms, a lot of people (probably including Turnbull) are going to give up waiting and the longer you’re in opposition the more pathological your politics can become.

  40. C K says:

    “CK, If you don’t like Turnbull call him ‘shithead’ or something like that.”

    Errr, no GregM. I don’t actually think he’s a shithead. I think he is quite grand.

    As People Skills said last night, GM’s “a primal force of nature.” He’s the one to lead the party back to the center and ditch the ‘wet’ ‘dry’ crap that is the dead inheritance of the Howard years.

    In other words the Thatcherism, Republican Party fads, dogwhistles and JHo’s personal bigotry that this lot have adopted for the last 30 years should be laid to rest along with their leader.

    Look, I voted Green, obviously hoped the CRodent’s pack of criminal losers would be trashed, love the fact that his legacy is a carwreck, but until this week I had no great faith in the ALP.

    Until today, that is. Honeymoon continues, no sign of Narrowing.

    Seven years after the dawn of 21C, we’re finally headed forward. And this is not about Rudd Huggs. We do need an effective Opposition to keep the government on its toes.

    Nelson and Bishop? Don’t make me laugh. They’re a ritual sacrifice until the real bovver-persons sort themselves out.

    It’s Teh Democracy stoopids!

  41. Bingo Bango Boingo says:

    Kim, you must have seen a different interview from the one that I saw. Nelson was anything but rambling. He refused to be drawn on the close ballot issue, and got to say his key lines about four times: “we are proud of our record”, “will be a strong opposition”, “turned from labor to liberal because I woke up”, “blah blah blah”. Kerry just let him go. It was a great example of staying ‘on message’ and overall it was an impressive early performance. Not sure what you mean by “wouldn’t shut up”. Kerry can’t conduct interviews by himself.

    BBB

  42. wasjotoo says:

    And do not forget Costello. He has avoided the poisoned chalice but may still be looking at a comeback.

    He says he has plans to humbly represent his constituents, for the next 3 years, if Macbank do not make a better offer. We shall see.

  43. mbahnisch says:

    Well, I saw the same interview as Kim, BBB. I also thought he spent far too long on answering the questions, and I very much doubt the convincingness of the message.

  44. mbahnisch says:

    Btw, the ALP machine is quick off the mark. Nelsonfacts launched today:

    http://www.nelsonfacts.com/

  45. Gaz says:

    This man will not last twelve months,I will give five to one odds.By any chance was Nelson a Proctologist?just a thought in passing.

  46. Bingo Bango Boingo says:

    Done Gaz. Ten bucks at 5-1 says Nelson will still be the leader of the Liberal Party on 29 November 2008.

    BBB

  47. skribeforti says:

    @38
    I think it’s only chance that it may work out that way. Personally I feel that Nelson will only be a sideshow to the main battle: Costello v Turnbull.

  48. Ambigulous says:

    Roger Jones @ 15

    I dips me seaman’s lid to you, Commodore. Admiral nabokov of the Russian Fleet could not have outclassed your stirling metaphors. Horatio indeed!

    So, is the Liberal Reps leadership now 50% union thugs? and 50% female? Is that Liberal ME-TOO-ism by any chance 😉

  49. Gaz says:

    “Done Gaz. Ten bucks at 5-1 says Nelson will still be the leader of the Liberal Party on 29 November 2008.

    BBB”

    That is a bet young Bingo.

    “Personally I feel that Nelson will only be a sideshow to the main battle: Costello v Turnbull.’

    Now there is a man who is tune with the real contest.

  50. wasjotoo says:

    “Ten bucks at 5-1 says Nelson will still be the leader of the Liberal Party on 29 November 2008.”

    Good luck BBB if you win that bet as far as i know it will be a lib historical first. They always dump their first stand up after an election.

  51. Gaz says:

    “They are going to pull on a double dissolution of parliament an ol “Kiss me Hardy” is going to be the fall guy when it turns to shit.

  52. GregM says:

    “Fair call, GregM, so I’ve removed the word “Petit” from the title of my earlier post and apologise for any offence.”

    Thanks Kim. You’ve always been fair-minded and fine-hearted.

    That aside, I have no trouble with anyone sticking the boot into Malcolm Turnbull. I happen to like him (though that does not mean I agree with him) and will be fascinated to see how he goes in our robust democracy.

  53. CK says:

    Ooooh mbahnisch@44. You are who, exactly?

    They’re quick off the mark aren’t they?

    I want my rocket-pack.

  54. Shaun says:

    In an attempt to raise the lever of discussion does anyone else think Nelson bears more than a passing resemblance to this chap?

  55. wbb says:

    .. more like one of these guys, Shaun, I’ve allus thought.

  56. Gaz says:

    “does anyone else think Nelson bears more than a passing resemblance to this chap?”

    That’s uncanny a spitting image.Will the real Beavis stand up.

  57. Stephen Hill says:

    Just watched Lateline, gee, what is happening to the state Libs in Queensland, that is some meltdown. Kevin Rudd should have thanked Santo Santoro in his victory speech

  58. #57, the Liberals in Qld have always been a bunch of total dickheads. Hence the (seemingly to be continued) domination by the National Party of that arm of Qld politics.

  59. #57, that is to say, there is nothing new in this, it is just the latest round of ongoing dickheadsmanship. The Qld Liberal party has been behaving like this, in one form or another, for all of my life.

  60. Nabakov says:

    Continuing the nautical analogies that have been raised here recently, I reckon Nelson’s the figurehead that thinks he’s leading the boat while Lieutants Turnbull and Abbott spar for the hearts and minds of the crew.
    “Tahiti! That’s the ticket! I have a damp but fine chart here!”
    “No lads, don’t risk it! Think of England and hands on top of the hammock!”

  61. Nabakov says:

    Great thread judo there, GregM.

    Your komment Kung Fu is strong.

  62. Kirsty M says:

    You’ve got to hand it to Nelson – as well as having stood for Labor preselection, averring at the time that it had always been a dream of his to be a Labor candidate (I’m paraphrasing, but not exaggerating), he managed to become one of the ideoloical warriors of the Howard years, especially in his time in education. He also screwed up the announcement of Jake Kovco’s death rather royally – and then tried to blame Angus Houston (who quietly contradicted him). Stellar.

  63. Bingo Bango Boingo says:

    “That is a bet young Bingo.”

    Nice one, Gaz.

    “Good luck BBB if you win that bet as far as i know it will be a lib historical first. They always dump their first stand up after an election.”

    Yeah but Gaz is being generous. I’m fairly sure Nelson’s chances of sticking around are better than those implied by the 5-1 odds I’m getting.

    BBB

  64. wasjotoo says:

    “In an attempt to raise the lever of discussion does anyone else think Nelson bears more than a passing resemblance to this chap?”

    Shaun, I have often thought that resemblance uncanny and provide another piccie for general consideration.

  65. Enemy Combatant says:

    {“GAPE! in awe as Grand Mal”

    This with “Petit Mal” from Enemy Combatant?

    Is it open season on people with disabilities at LP now?

    It seems to me that John Howard has won his war on political correctness.

    Comment by GregM — November 29, 2007 @ 8:21 pm]

    Greg, please allow me to spell it out for you.

    Petit. A French word, masculine gender, meaning small.

    Mal. Capital Noun, diminutive of Malcolm (Turnbull).

    Translates to; “Little Mal”.

    Greg, if you had more than a fleeting knowledge of correct neuro-pathological terminology, you would appreciate that the condition to which you refer to is spelt entirely in the lower case.
    If it’s to be open season on anyone, perhaps it should be on demonstrably functional illiterates trying to kick arse way beyond their league.

  66. Waxeater says:

    Krudd + Meat-axe + Public Service = 2nd non-core promise down the gurglar.

  67. mbahnisch says:

    Not at all. You can do it by natural attrition and not approving new positions. You don’t need to sack people. Sorry to all those who approve of sacking people.

  68. Enemy Combatant says:

    OK, Greg maybe that was a bit strong on a re-read, but for goodness sakes, let’s not get back to the tippy-toeing around egg-shells super-sensitivities of personhole, huntsperson spider etc.

    Nevertheless, I stand my ground on correct usage,sir.

  69. Bingo Bango Boingo says:

    EC, all you’ve demonstrated is that you didn’t understand why Kim used the word ‘petit’ in her original post title. In light of that you are hardly in a position to accuse others of functional illiteracy.

    As for razor gangs, I’m afraid that Waxeater has got it slightly wrong. The Filthy Liberal’s promise was really about shifting staff and other administrative resources into ‘frontline’ services. I suppose you can have an argument about what ‘frontline’ services are, but you can’t really accuse him of breaking a promise to sack people.

    Cheers
    BBB

  70. Waxeater says:

    #67. Did you type that with a straight face? Do you know something about a new strain of some type of virus heading Canbera way? More gold.

  71. Birdie says:

    I did a bit of poll within the large Chinese community this week in Barton. This included a masseuse, the corner grog shop, grocery store, fruit & vegetable shop, beautician, hairdresser, army disposal, dry cleaner, several restaurants and take away food joints, shoe repair, the council library, couple of taxi drivers, co-workers in the area and neighbours.

    Everyone said they voted ALP. Everyone mentioned first that Mr Rudd spoke Chinese, or Mandarin, followed typically by delighted giggling, and secondly, everyone said, in one way or another, that Mr Rudd was smarter than Mr Howard (the two things were interlinked, I gathered) and thirdly, that he was not racist, like nasty Mr Howard.

    Love it.

  72. Chris says:

    “Not at all. You can do it by natural attrition and not approving new positions. You don’t need to sack people. Sorry to all those who approve of sacking people.”

    Given that most of the public servants I’ve run into complain that they are already understaffed and struggling under the workload, not replacing people basically just shift even more workload onto those who are left.

    Was rather funny to hear a green candidate (not Kerrie Tucker who gave a much better response) in the ACT just before the election claim that since the unemployment rate was so low in the ACT that sacking a bunch of public servants wouldn’t hurt them as they’d soon find new jobs – shift the context a bit and it would be someone spruiking workchoices 😉

  73. wasjotoo says:

    Interesting Chris.

    Bob Brown called Rudds’ ,election eve plan, to slash public servants jobs a mistake. The vote in the ACT, he suggested, went back in a conservative direction and destroyed a chance of an immediate Senate control change.

    Would not be surprised myself that Rudd was happy for a bit more time and did not want to deal with Kerrie Tucker. Greens have smelly socks.

  74. mbahnisch says:

    Given that most of the public servants I’ve run into complain that they are already understaffed and struggling under the workload, not replacing people basically just shift even more workload onto those who are left.

    Two points:

    (a) not necessarily if you rationalise the tasks they have to do. How much of this is “make work”? That’s not a criticism of those doing it, but as Lindsay Tanner asked a while back – what exactly is the need for a department of communications and what do the people working in it produce? In the case of Education, a lot of it is micro-managing decisions that should be made by universities and the states and monitoring reports in a vastly over-regulated domain. If you simultaneously get serious with deregulation, Bob’s your uncle.

    (b) 44% increase in SES positions over the last five years seems excessive by any measure.

  75. Chris says:

    Mark – with respect to (a), since they’re talking about savings in the hundreds of millions of dollars if not billions, I’m rather skeptical they can save that much without removing real “meat”. I kind of a suspect in the long term we won’t see much as the statement was probably done for populism reasons outside of Canberra. Everyone likes to take a dig at Canberra – even some of us in Canberra – sometimes its like living in a magic bubble of left-wing values and prosperity!

    As you can see from the demotion of both Bob McMullan and Kate Lundy, Canberra is such a Labor stronghold, they can afford to take it for granted.

    wrt to (b) I agree, and there won’t be many complaints if that gets cut back, but doing it by attrition is going to take a long time.

  76. mbahnisch says:

    On (a), Chris, they weren’t just talking about jobs but savings generally. I’m sure they can cut budgets for things like consultancies and advertising fairly easily, and Tanner was fairly persuasive on Lateline about some instances of dodgy funding requests already identified (ie asking for specific money for IT upgrades when this is meant to come out of depreciation funding – ie double dipping). It may be that if functions disappear, then redundancies might come into play, but I think they’re still not really in a position to say at this stage of the game.

    On (b), I’m sure it’s a hint for some people to polish up their cvs. If I were working somewhere closely aligned with Howard gov’t policy like the Workplace Authority or the Fair Pay Commission, that’s what I’d be doing (not that I’d have applied for jobs there in the first place!)…

  77. Enemy Combatant says:

    “EC, all you’ve demonstrated is that you didn’t understand why Kim used the word ‘petit’ in her original post title.”

    Bingo, Kim used it with a Capital P as I recall, It’s no longer there. Perhaps you’d care to clarify Kim’s meaning?

  78. kimberella says:

    I used it because I thought it was funny – borrowed it off EC. I thought it was a ref to Turnbull’s stature compared to big Mal Fraser. The epilepsy overtone I don’t think was intentional, but I do think it’s better to stay on the safe side on these matters if people take offence.

  79. The Doctor says:

    I’d pity Nelson, but for the fact he’s a volunteer, with Abbott to the right and Turnbull to the Left both waiting for the stuff-up.

    Sounds like thw WA Libs are forcing the party to commit suicide – by supporting both the content and implementation process of WorkChoices.

  80. Frank Calabrese says:

    Speaking of sore losing Libs, check out the JTV story of Howard’s Election Night Bash.

    http://www.abc.net.au/jtv/video/default.htm?clip=howardsparty

  81. Paul Burns says:

    Among my various disabilities I suffer from epilepsy associated with mild cerebral palsy. I don’t give a stuff what people call Turnbull so long ait is either insulting or demeaning. So there.I don’t even really care if people call me spaqstic so long as their tone is friendly.
    I get great delight out of confusingly thinking I’m stoned, when really I just have that spastic stare.
    I get even greater delight out of the shocked expressions on peoples’ faces when they realise I’m extremely intelligent, and not intellectually challenged. I also get away with an awful lot that I wouldn’t be able to get away with if I wasn’t mildly disabled in terns of socially inappropriate behaviour.In fact, most of the time my life is a lot if fun. For me, anyway.

  82. Paul Burns says:

    Spelling corrects to 81.
    so long as it
    great delight out of cops confusedly thinking
    Sorry.

  83. Bingo Bango Boingo says:

    EC, in view of Kim’s latest comment, I stand well and truly corrected. Apologies!

    BBB

  84. tigtog says:

    BBB,

    the spaminator keeps on catching your comments because you haven’t supplied a valid email address. Because you haven’t supplied a valid email address, I have been unable to let you know this via email, thus I have to let you know publicly.

    Please create some anonymous but valid email account somewhere and use it in future, would you? Fishing you out of the spaminator is quite tedious, and the more tedious it gets the longer it is likely to be put off.

  85. Paul Burns says:

    Its finally official. Howard has lost Bennelong. Journalists are searching for him to get a comment but, surprise! he can’t be found.

  86. Enemy Combatant says:

    Bingo, accepted and thank you.

    Paul, rodentia in absentia, eh! It’s only a week ago tonight we took him to the vet.
    Loved your comments at 81. Me peripheral electrics and mechanicals still work orright, but on any given day I can screw-up with the best of ’em. Once my friends found me in the gutter with both palms arond my skull frantically trying to remove my head from my “neck-piece” in order to better examine the wiring inside my brain. (from hst)

  87. CK says:

    ‘ “CK, If you don’t like Turnbull call him ’shithead’ or something like that.”

    Errr, no GregM. I don’t actually think he’s a shithead. I think he is quite grand.’

    But in deference to people’s sensibilities I think Mal Content may be more appropriate.

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